FAQ’s

Q: How do I register for education and therapy services?

A: To enroll and receive any of our services, all clients need to first make an appointment. We encourage you to be as specific as possible in identifying your needs in order to schedule you with the most appropriate intake counselor and or therapist. You will need to call (303) 252-4179 during business hours:

Monday and Tuesday 2 PM-8 PM

Wednesday and Thursday 12 PM-8 PM

Friday 12-5 PM

Saturday 8 AM-12 PM

Information will be given to you regarding fees for services, available times and days of group sessions, and information that you will need to provide at the time of your first appointment.

Q: How do I register for monitoring services?

A: Many clients ask to be monitored for personal non-court ordered reasons. Most of our clients are court ordered. We ask that you provide us with the information given to you by the referring agency/probation officer/social worker/court order/or other. Often the referring agency will fax such order to us. However this is not always the case, so we ask that you bring your copy of the order if it was provided to you.

Registration hours are:

Monday and Tuesday 2 PM-8 PM

Wednesday and Thursday 12 PM-8 PM

Friday 12-5 PM

Saturday 8 AM-12 PM

To make an appointment call (303) 252-4179. If you show up without an appointment, know that your admission process may take longer as staff may be busy with other clients at the time.

Q: What are your hours of operation?

A: Front desk is open:

Monday and Tuesday 2 PM-8 PM

Wednesday and Thursday 12 PM-8 PM

Friday 12-5 PM

Saturday 8 AM-12 PM

Monitoring Hours for Breathalyzers/Antabuse:

Monday and Tuesday 2 PM-8 PM

Wednesday and Thursday 12 PM-8 PM

Friday 12-5 PM

Saturday 8 AM-12 PM

Please call to find our specific schedules for Urinalysis Screening and group sessions.

Q: Is my information confidential?

A: The confidentiality of client records maintained by this agency is protected by Federal Law and regulations. For more details refer to 42 U.S.C. 290dd-3 and 42 U.S.C. 290ee-3 for Federal law and 42CFR Part 2 for Federal regulations in the state and federal laws web sites.

Q: What if I have to move out of town?

A: Most clients must inform and seek approval of such moves from the referring agency. Our responsibility is to have the client clear all debts in order to secure a swift transfer of necessary records to complete all treatment requirements elsewhere.

Q: Do you take credit cards?

A: Yes Payments can be made by Cash, Credit/Debit, or Money Order. Vouchers for payment from referring agencies must be available at the time of service.

 

Q: What is Interlock Enhancement Counseling?

A: With funding from the Persistent Drunk Driver Fund, a protocol was developed in 2009 called Interlock Enhancement Counseling©® (IEC) to be used as an adjunct to DUI education and treatment for those DUI offenders who have an interlock installed in their vehicles. It is a 10 hour motivation based brief intervention that consists of 4 brief individual sessions and 4 groups. Learn more here > IEC FAQ.

 

 

 

References:

Alcohol Interlock Curriculum for Practitioners, TIRF,  http://aic.tirf.ca/section1/index.php

Beirness, D.J., Simpson, H.M., Mayhew, D.R. (1998). Programs and policies for reducing alcohol-related motor

vehicle deaths and injuries. Contemporary Drug Problems 25: 553-578.

Beirness, D.J. (2001). Best Practices for Alcohol Interlock Programs. Ottawa: Traffic Injury Research Foundation. 5

Beirness, D.J. and Robertson, R.D. (2003). Alcohol Interlock Programs: Enhancing Acceptance, Participation and

Compliance. Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium of Alcohol Ignition Interlocks, Hilton Head,

South Carolina, October 27-28, 2003. Ottawa: Traffic Injury Research Foundation.

Beirness, D.J., Simpson, H.M., Robertson, R.D. (2003). International symposium on enhancing the effectiveness

of alcohol ignition interlock programs. Traffic Injury Prevention 4(3): 179-182.

Coben, J.H. and Larkin, G.L. (1999). Effectiveness of ignition interlock devices in reducing drunk driving

recidivism. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 16: 81-87.

DeYoung, D.J. (2002). An evaluation of the implementation of ignition interlock in California. Journal of Safety

Research 33: 473-482

Jones, B. (1993). The effectiveness of Oregon’s ignition interlock program. In: H.-D. Utzelmann , G. Berghaus,

  1. Kroj (Eds.) Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety – T-92: Proceedings of the 12th international conference on

alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, Köln, Germany, 28 September – 2 October 1992. Köln: Verlage TÜV Rheinland

GmbH, Vol. 3, pp. 1460-1465.

Marques, P.R., Tippetts, A.S., Voas, R.B., Beirness, D.J. (2001). Predicting repeat DWI offenses with the alcohol

interlock recorder. Accident Analysis and Prevention 33(5): 609-619.

Marques, P. R. (2008c, October). “Alcohol Ignition Interlock Facts (and some evidence—based conjectures).”

Calverton, MD: Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, pp. 1–4.

National Highway Traffic Safety Association,  http://www.nhtsa.gov

NHTSA (2009) Ignition Interlocks – What You Need to Know: A Toolkit for Policymakers, Highway Safety

Professionals, and Advocates, DOT HS 811 246 Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety

Administration, page 5 http://www.nhtsa.gov/staticfiles/nti/impaired_driving/pdf/811246.pdf

Popkin, C.L., Stewart, J.R., Beckmeyer, J., Martell, C. (1993). An evaluation of the effectiveness of interlock

systems in preventing DWI recidivism among second-time DWI offenders. In: H.-D. Utzelmann , G. Berghaus,

  1. Kroj (Eds.) Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety – T-92: Proceedings of the 12th international conference on

alcohol, drugs and traffic safety, Köln, Germany, 28 September – 2 October 1992. Köln: Verlage TÜV Rheinland

GmbH, Vol. 3, pp. 1466-1470.

Raub, R.A., Lucke, R.E., and Wark, R.I. (2003). Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Devices: Controlling the

Recidivist. Traffic Injury Prevention 4: 199-205.

Task Force on Community Preventive Services (2011), Recommendations on the Effectiveness of Ignition

Interlocks for Preventing Alcohol-Impaired Driving and Alcohol-Related Crashes, American Journal of

Preventive Medicine 2011 Mar; 40(3): 377

Timken, D.S. and Marques, P.R. (2001b) Support for Interlock Planning (SIP): Provider’s Manual.

Calverton MD: Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation.

Timken, D.S., Nandi, A, Marques, P. R., (2010). Interlock Enhancement Counseling: Enhancing Motivation For

Responsible Driving, A Provider’s Guide

Tippetts, A.S. and Voas, R.B. (1997). The effectiveness of the West Virginia interlock program on second drunkdriving offenders. In: C. Mercier-Guyon (Ed.) Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety – T97. Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety, Annecy, France, September 21-26, 1997. Annecy: CERMT, Vol.1, pp. 185–192.

Venzina, L. (2002). The Quebec Alcohol Interlock Program: Impact on Recidivism and Crashes. In: D.R. Mayhew & C. Dussault (Eds.) Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety 0 T2002. Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety. Montreal, August 4-9, 2002. Quebec City: Societe de l’assurance automobile du Quebec, pp. 97-104.

Voas, R.B. and Marques, P.R. (2003). Commentary: Barriers to Interlock Implementation. Traffic Injury Prevention 4(3): 183-187.